Headaches Helped with Chiropractic - A Case Study

2011-09-12 Headaches Helped with Chiropractic - A Case Study

A documented case study appeared in the scientific periodical, the Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health on August 11, 2011 showing chiropractic helping an 8-year-old boy suffering from headaches. The study authors begin by noting that about 75% of children report a notable headache by age 15.

The authors report that cervical (neck) subluxations, and the resulting changes in cervical curves have been shown to be a factor in headaches. Past studies show that people with necks that do not have their normal forward curvature and have become straight or reversed are particularly prone to headaches.

In this study, the 8-year-old boy was brought to the chiropractor with complaints of headaches, muscle aches, fatigue, allergies, and digestive problems. The boy's headaches were described as sharp and throbbing, and were made worse with noise, but improved when he was lying down. The boy's headaches were mainly in the front of his head and would last the entire day, sometimes even waking him at night.

Over the previous year, the boy's health continued to decline, and he became less able to engage in normal activities that he had previously enjoyed. In response, his parents had taken him to a pediatric neurologist-headache specialist, an allergist, a nutritionist, and a psychologist. Recommendations and medications from the medical health practitioners gave little or no relief to the boy.

A chiropractic examination and x-rays were performed, and revealed subluxations with cervical curve changes in the neck area. Chiropractic care was initiated with the child initially being seen three times per week and gradually reduced in frequency.

As a result of the chiropractic care, the child's headaches were alleviated and post x-rays showed an improvement of the neck curvature. The boy was involved in an auto accident later in his care. Fortunately, his headaches did not return, and he suffered no ill effects from the incident.

In the discussion area of the study, the authors conclude by stating, "It seems that evidence points to the cervical spine and itís alignment as a critical factor in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cervicogenic headache in the pediatric population."